Bitcoin Could Become the First Global Asset Bubble

Why Bitcoins Price Could Go Much Higher

This is pure speculation. Don’t trade off of my opinion. Its a quick thought.

When thinking about the “bitcoin bubble” that so many are wanting to call  I was theorizing at what price might you say: “This is a bubble”. Throughout history there have been countless bubbles: real estate, tech stocks, beanie babies. The thing about all of these bubbles is that they were fairly localized. Meaning these were bubbles that had high barriers to entry. Someone in India would have a hard time speculating on San Francisco real estate prices. A guy with $10 in Uruguay probably couldn’t open a brokerage account and buy internet stocks.

But, here is the thing:

All people, virtually anywhere can buy Bitcoin. If you have access to an internet connection, you can get in. Heck, with Bitcoin ATM’s maybe you don’t even need that. Governments globally are talking about how to handle Bitcoin and cryptocurrency.  I can’t recall of a time when every government in the world was talking about bond or stock prices.

I think this is the first time in history that the entire world can all speculate on the exact same asset. Currently, there is very little barrier to entry. There are no storage fees, minimum purchase levels or geographic restrictions.

When you start to think about that it becomes difficult to process. You can argue that the current price is in “bubble” territory. That does not mean the price can’t continue to rise.

Who knows, maybe this is just the start. The point is I don’t think the world has ever seen anything like this before. Hopefully it ends well.

 

Harvard Economist Says Bitcoins a Bubble

He brings up some valid points, particularly:

  • Governments will let the private sector develop the technology and then usurp it for their own use
  • Its not easy for alt-coins to beat Bitcoins lead in credibility and scale

People continue to say that Bitcoins value is in its anonymity – its not really anonymous. The IRS uses software to track people using it now. You can’t discount the value of speed and also owning your own money. This means not having to rely on a bank.

As for the bubble talk – I don’t think Bitcoin is a bubble. But I think ICO’s are definitely a bubble. 

Read the Guardian Here:

Is the cryptocurrency bitcoin the biggest bubble in the world today, or a great investment bet on the cutting edge of new-age financial technology? My best guess is that in the long run, the technology will thrive, but that the price of bitcoin will collapse.

If you haven’t been following the bitcoin story, its price is up 600% over the past 12 months, and 1,600% in the past 24 months. At over $4,200 (as of 5 October), a single unit of the virtual currency is now worth more than three times an ounce of gold. Some bitcoin evangelists see it going far higher in the next few years.

What happens from here will depend a lot on how governments react. Will they tolerate anonymous payment systems that facilitate tax evasion and crime? Will they create digital currencies of their own? Another key question is how successfully bitcoin’s numerous “alt-coin” competitors can penetrate the market.

In principle, it is supremely easy to clone or improve on bitcoin’s technology. What is not so easy is to duplicate bitcoin’s established lead in credibility and the large ecosystem of applications that have built up around it.

For now, the regulatory environment remains a free-for-all. China’s government, concerned about the use of bitcoin in capital flight and tax evasion, has recently banned bitcoin exchanges. Japan, on the other hand, has enshrined bitcoin as legal tender, in an apparent bid to become the global centre of fintech.

Bitcoin price
Bitcoin price Photograph: Project Syndicate

The United States is taking tentative steps to follow Japan in regulating fintech, though the endgame is far from clear. Importantly, bitcoin does not need to win every battle to justify a sky-high price. Japan, the world’s third largest economy, has an extraordinarily high currency-to-income ratio (roughly 20%), so bitcoin’s success there is a major triumph.

As of early October, Ethereum’s market capitalisation stood at $28bn, versus $72bn for bitcoin. Ripple, a platform championed by the banking sector to slash transaction costs for interbank and overseas transfers, is a distant third at $9bn. Behind the top three are dozens of fledgling competitors.

Most experts agree that the ingenious technology behind virtual currencies may have broad applications for cybersecurity, which currently poses one of the biggest challenges to the stability of the global financial system. For many developers, the goal of achieving a cheaper, more secure payments mechanism has supplanted bitcoin’s ambition of replacing dollars.

But it is folly to think that bitcoin will ever be allowed to supplant central-bank-issued money. It is one thing for governments to allow small anonymous transactions with virtual currencies; indeed, this would be desirable. But it is an entirely different matter for governments to allow large-scale anonymous payments, which would make it extremely difficult to collect taxes or counter criminal activity. Of course, as I note in my recent book on past, present, and future currencies, governments that issue large-denomination bills also risk aiding tax evasion and crime. But cash at least has bulk, unlike virtual currency.

It will be interesting to see how the Japanese experiment evolves. The government has indicated that it will force bitcoin exchanges to be on the lookout for criminal activity and to collect information on deposit holders. Still, one can be sure that global tax evaders will seek ways to acquire bitcoin anonymously abroad and then launder their money through Japanese accounts. Carrying paper currency in and out of a country is a major cost for tax evaders and criminals; by embracing virtual currencies, Japan risks becoming a Switzerland-like tax haven – with the bank secrecy laws baked into the technology.

Were bitcoin stripped of its near-anonymity, it would be hard to justify its current price. Perhaps bitcoin speculators are betting that there will always be a consortium of rogue states allowing anonymous bitcoin usage, or even state actors such as North Korea that will exploit it.

Finally, it is hard to see what would stop central banks from creating their own digital currencies and using regulation to tilt the playing field until they win. The long history of currency tells us that what the private sector innovates, the state eventually regulates and appropriates. I have no idea where bitcoin’s price will go over the next couple years, but there is no reason to expect virtual currency to avoid a similar fate.

Kenneth Rogoff is professor of economics and public policy at Harvard University. He was the chief economist of the IMF from 2001 to 2003.